Pesticides and amphibian population declines in California, USA

Sparling, D.W., Fellers, G.M., McConnell, L.L. (2001) Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 20(7), 1591-1595 Several species of anuran amphibians have undergone drastic population declines in the western United States over the last 10 to 15 years. In California, the most severe declines are in the Sierra Mountains east of the Central Valley and downwind of the intensely agricultural San Joaquin Valley. In contrast, coastal and more northern populations across from the less agrarian Sacramento Valley are stable or declining less precipitously. In this article, we provide evidence that pesticides are instrumental…

See more and a link to full text

Declining Downwind: Amphibian Population Declines in California and Historical Pesticide Use

Davidson, C. (2004) Ecological Applications, 14(6), 1892-1902 Pesticides have long been proposed as a possible cause of amphibian population declines, but due to a number of challenges there has been relatively little ecotoxicological research on pesticides and declines in natural populations. My study examines the association between the spatial patterns of declines for five California amphibian species and historical patterns of pesticide use in California from 1974 to 1991 based on Department of Pesticide Regulation records. Information on declines was derived from maps of historical sites and current population status…

See more and a link to full text

Soil microbial diversity and community structure under wheat as influenced by tillage and crop rotation

Lupwayi, N.Z., Rice, W.A., Clayton, G.W. (1998) Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 30(13), 1733-1741 Soil microbial diversity is important to sustainable agriculture because microbes mediate many processes that support agricultural production. The BIOLOG system for detection of specific patterns of substrate utilization by bacteria was used to investigate the effects of tillage and crop rotation on the diversity and community structure of soil bacteria. In each of 2 yr, soil was sampled (0-7.5 cm) in the wheat phase of different cropping rotations which had been established under zero tillage or conventional…

See more and a link to full text

Gender-specific neuroimmunoendocrine aging in a triple-transgenic 3xTg-AD mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease and its relation with longevity

Gimenez-Llort, L., Arranz, L., Mate, I., De la Fuente, M. (2008) Neuroimmunomodulation, 15(4-6), 331-343 In the present work, we briefly review the evidence on the key role played by the neuroimmunoendocrine network in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and provide new behavioral, immune and endocrinological data obtained on old male and female triple-transgenic 3xTg-AD mice harboring PS1(M146V), APP(Swe) and tau(P301L) transgenes in contrast to wild-type animals. The results indicate that several aspects of the impairment of the neuroimmunoendocrine network that occurs with aging are more evident in the 3xTg-AD…

See more and a link to full text

A hospital outbreak of Serratia marcescens associated with ultrasonic nebulizers

Ringrose, R.E., McKown, B., Felton, F.G., Barclay, B.O., Muchmore, H.G., Rhoades, E.R. (1968) Annals of Internal Medicine, 69(4), 719-729 A sevenfold increase in the frequency of isolation of Serratia marcescens was noted during a 2-month period. Nineteen patients were involved, and the majority of these patients acquired the organism during hospitalization. Two of the patients had signs and symptoms of definite infection. Seven others probably had infections, and the remainder appeared to have had simple colonization. All 19 patients had associated medical conditions or prior therapy. S. marcescens should be…

See more and a link to full text

Influence of relative humidity on particle size and UV sensitivity of Serratia marcescens and Mycobacterium bovis BCG aerosols

Ko, G., First, M.W., Burge, H.A. (2000) Tubercle and Lung Disease: the Official Journal of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 80(4-5), 217-228 SETTING: A study of Serratia marcescens and BCG aerosols. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of relative humidity (RH) on (1) the particle size and (2) sensitivity of 254nm germicidal ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. METHODS: We built a RH controlled experimental chamber into which bacteria were aerosolized, exposed to varying amounts of UV irradiance over measured time periods, and quantitatively evaluated for viability. Aerosolized Serratia marcescens and…

See more and a link to full text

Farm-to-school programs: perspectives of school food service professionals

Izumi, B.T., Alaimo, K., Hamm, M.W. (2010) Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 42(2), 83-91 OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study used a case study approach to explore the potential of farm-to-school programs to simultaneously improve children’s diets and provide farmers with viable market opportunities. DESIGN: Semi-structured interviews were the primary data collection strategy. SETTING: Seven farm-to-school programs in the Upper Midwest and Northeast regions of the United States. PARTICIPANTS: Seven school food service professionals, 7 farmers, and 4 food distributors recruited from 7 farm-to-school programs. PHENOMENON OF INTEREST: Interviews probed why…

See more and a link to full text

The relevance of gene transfer to the safety of food and feed derived from genetically modified (GM) plants

van den Eede, G., Aarts, H., Buhk, H.-J., Corthier, G., Flint, H.J., Hammes, W., Jacobsen, B., Midtvedt, T., van der Vossen, J., von Wright, A., Wackernagel, W., Wilcks, A. (2004) Food and Chemical Toxicology: an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, 42(7), 1127-1156 In 2000, the thematic network ENTRANSFOOD was launched to assess four different topics that are all related to the testing or assessment of food containing or produced from genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Each of the topics was linked to a European Commission (EC)-funded…

See more and a link to full text

Climate change and wildfire in California

Westerling, A.L., Bryant, B.P. (2008) Climatic Change, 87(S1), 231-249 Wildfire risks for California under four climatic change scenarios were statistically modeled as functions of climate, hydrology, and topography. Wildfire risks for the GFDL and PCM global climate models and the A2 and B1 emissions scenarios were compared for 2005-2034, 2035-2064, and 2070-2099 against a modeled 1961-1990 reference period in California and neighboring states. Outcomes for the GFDL model runs, which exhibit higher temperatures than the PCM model runs, diverged sharply for different kinds of fire regimes, with increased temperatures promoting…

See more and a link to full text

Growth, Physiology and Biochemical Responses of Two Different Brassica Species to Elevated CO2

**top choice** Chakraborty, K., Uprety, D.C., Bhaduri, D. (2017) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, India Section B: Biological Sciences, 87(2), 389-397 In an open top chamber study, two contrasting Brassica cultivars from two different species were grown under two distinct levels of CO2 concentration, 550 umol mol-1 (elevated) and 390 umol mol-1 (ambient). CO2 enrichment showed significant increase in growth, leaf area and dry matter production in both the species. The continuous higher rate of photosynthesis (36.2 % in RH-30 and 27.3 % in Pusa Gold) under elevated…

See more and a link to full text
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.