Facial recognition technology can expose political orientation from naturalistic facial images

Author: Kosinski, Michal Description: Ubiquitous facial recognition technology can expose individuals’ political orientation, as faces of liberals and conservatives consistently differ. A facial recognition algorithm was applied to naturalistic images of 1,085,795 individuals to predict their political orientation by comparing their similarity to faces of liberal and conservative others. Political orientation was correctly classified in 72% of liberal-conservative face pairs, remarkably better than chance (50%), human accuracy (55%), or one afforded by a 100-item personality questionnaire (66%). Accuracy was similar across countries (the U.S., Canada, and the UK), environments (Facebook…

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Facial recognition technology in schools: critical questions and concerns

Author: Andrejevic, Mark; Selwyn, Neil Description: Facial recognition technology is now being introduced across various aspects of public life. This includes the burgeoning integration of facial recognition and facial detection into compulsory schooling to address issues such as campus security, automated registration and student emotion detection. So far, these technologies have largely been seen as routine additions to school systems with already extensive cultures of monitoring and surveillance. While critical commentators are beginning to question the pedagogical limitations of facially driven learning, this article contends that school-based facial recognition presents…

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What Are Important Ethical Implications of Using Facial Recognition Technology in Health Care?

Author: Martinez-Martin, Nicole Description: Applications of facial recognition technology (FRT) in health care settings have been developed to identify and monitor patients as well as to diagnose genetic, medical, and behavioral conditions. The use of FRT in health care suggests the importance of informed consent, data input and analysis quality, effective communication about incidental findings, and potential influence on patient-clinician relationships. Privacy and data protection are thought to present challenges for the use of FRT for health applications. Subject headings: Confidentiality; Delivery of Health Care; Facial Recognition; Humans; Informed Consent;…

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From faces to hands: Changing visual input in the first two years

Author: Fausey, C.M.; Jayaraman, S.; Smith, L.B. Description: Human development takes place in a social context. Two pervasive sources of social information are faces and hands. Here, we provide the first report of the visual frequency of faces and hands in the everyday scenes available to infants. These scenes were collected by having infants wear head cameras during unconstrained everyday activities. Our corpus of 143 hours of infant-perspective scenes, collected from 34 infants aged 1 month to 2 years, was sampled for analysis at 1/5Hz. The major finding from this…

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Facial-recognition algorithms: A literature review

Author: Kaur, Paramjit; Krishan, Kewal; Sharma, Suresh K.; Kanchan, Tanuj Description: The face is an important part of the human body, distinguishing individuals in large groups of people. Thus, because of its universality and uniqueness, it has become the most widely used and accepted biometric method. The domain of face recognition has gained the attention of many scientists, and hence it has become a standard benchmark in the area of human recognition. It has turned out to be the most deeply studied area in computer vision for more than four…

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A survey on facial soft biometrics for video surveillance and forensic applications

Author: Becerra-Riera, Fabiola; Morales-Gonzalez, Annette; Mendez-Vazquez, Heydi Description: The face is one of the most reliable and easy-to-acquire biometric features, widely used for the recognition of individuals. In controlled environments facial recognition systems are highly effective, however, in real world scenarios and under varying lighting conditions, pose changes, facial expressions, occlusions and low resolution of captured images/videos, the task of recognizing faces becomes significantly complex. In this context it has been shown that certain attributes can be retrieved with a relative probability of success, being useful to complement a non-conclusive…

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Deep neural networks are more accurate than humans at detecting sexual orientation from facial images

Author: Wang, Yilun; Kosinski, Michal Description: We show that faces contain much more information about sexual orientation than can be perceived or interpreted by the human brain. We used deep neural networks to extract features from 35,326 facial images. These features were entered into a logistic regression aimed at classifying sexual orientation. Given a single facial image, a classifier could correctly distinguish between gay and heterosexual men in 81% of cases, and in 71% of cases for women. Human judges achieved much lower accuracy: 61% for men and 54% for…

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Face recognition technology: security versus privacy

Author: Bowyer, K. W. Description: Video surveillance and face recognition systems have become the subject of increased interest and controversy after the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. In favor of face recognition technology, there is the lure of a powerful tool to aid national security. On the negative side, there are fears of an Orwellian invasion of privacy. Given the ongoing nature of the controversy, and the fact that face recognition systems represent leading edge and rapidly changing technology, face recognition technology is currently a major issue…

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The Death of Privacy?

Author: Froomkin, A. Michael Description: The rapid deployment of privacy-destroying technologies by governments and businesses threatens to make informational privacy obsolete. The first part of this article describes a range of current technologies to which the law has yet to respond effectively. These include: routine collection of transactional data, growing automated surveillance in public places, deployment of facial recognition technology and other biometrics, cell-phone tracking, vehicle tracking, satellite monitoring, workplace surveillance, Internet tracking from cookies to clicktrails, and sense-enhanced searches that allow observers to see through everything from walls to…

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Power, individuation, and the cross-race recognition deficit

Author: Shriver, E.R.; Hugenberg, K. Description: The well-known cross-race effect (CRE) in facial recognition is observed as better recognition for faces of one’s own race than faces of another race. Across two experiments, this very robust phenomenon was attenuated via an increase in cross-race (CR) recognition when CR targets were perceived as wielding power either because of their occupational roles (Experiment 1) or the behaviors in which they engaged (Experiment 2). Furthermore, evidence in Experiment 2 indicates that neither target stereotypicality nor target valence can easily explain the observed increase…

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